So What Will You Find Here ??

THIS WEBSITE CONTAINS MANY PHOTO'S, VIDEO'S AND WRITE-UPS ON A RANGE OF SUBJECTS. DON'T MISS OUT BY NOT EXPLORING FURTHER. IF YOU WANT TO SEE A PARTICULAR SUBJECT OR PERSON, GO TO THE SEARCH ENTRY ON THE RIGHT AND TYPE IN YOUR SEARCH NAMES/TITLES. THE PAGES WILL COME UP ON THIS (LEFT) SIDE BELOW. Scroll down them to view.
Who's this BLOG about? What a good question.

After many years in the Royal Air Force and a posting to RAF Coltishall Wally also created the Solarscope mobile disco's with gigs as far as Manchester. He was resident DJ at Scamps Nightclub in Norwich during the 70's and had a show on Hospital Radio Norwich.
Wally joined BBC Radio Norfolk when it began broadcasting on September 11th 1980 and has been there ever since.
He's Patron of the East Coast Truckers Childrens Charity and President of the Potter Heigham Country Fayre Fundraisers.
He rides a 1966 Lambretta 125 Special and spends a lot of time cruising on the Norfolk Broads.
He's an Ambassador for the Wherry Albion of the Norfolk Wherry Trust, a Friend of Hardley Windpump and a volunteer litter picker for his home community and a videographer for the East Anglian Air Ambulance.
Apart from serving in the Royal Air Force he's also a founder member of the East Norfolk Militia from which he's now retired and served four years as a Governor of Thorpe St.Andrew High School.
This Blog will keep you up to date on all these activities or you can go to his sister Blog to concentrate on the Norfolk Broads. All views and opinions that may be expressed are those of the author and not of the BBC.

Thank You For Your Visit

SmileyCentral.com TO SEND ME AN E-MAIL NOW CLICK ON THIS ADDRESS wally.webb@bbc.co.uk OR - send a message to Wally Webb on Facebook HERE'S THE LATEST NEWS FOR WALLY'S BLOG.

ALL ANSWERS from Eastern Counties Early Breakfast Show NOW POSTED DAILY ON FACEBOOK. Become a Friend?

FOR MORE INFORMATON ABOUT THIS BLOG PLEASE SCROLL DOWN TO BOTTOM OF THE PAGE.

Sunday, July 20, 2008

Week On The Waveney

So, if you recall, I was only taking a weeks leave so that you could all enjoy some sunshine. We always seem to strike it lucky and for the most part we weren't disappointed. Howabout you?
Here's the sky which greeted us for the first three days although it was on the second day that we nearly had to abandon everything. Why you ask?
THE SKY OVER THE WAVENEY We'd been out for a walk and returned to the boat. Ever the gentleman I unfastened the awning flap to let Sheri and Fudge get aboard. Unfortunately, as I lifted the flap it took my glasses clean off my head. ANOTHER DUCK FLIES IN FOR FOOD
You know that awful moment in any catastrophe - when the whole world goes in slow motion. The glasses spinning slowly and rising into the air just catching a glint of the sunlight. The curve of their orbit as they start the descent earthwards.
Down down past the grass, caressing the quay heading as they bounce ever lower to the water which swallows them up whole!
With no spare pair on board (or at home) Sheri - "I told you to go weeks ago." I was damned if we were calling it quits. "I'm not leaving here until I get those glasses back one way or another.
Here you see what I tried first. A triple hooked pike spinner on the end of the fishing line. My thought being, if I use my landing net I'll probably break the specs by scooping them up. A hook might just catch hold of the frame with no problems. How wrong I was proved to be. After some time a young fellow came over from where he'd been fishing nearby.
"Caught much?" he casually asked. I looked up from my lowly kneeling position and it would have been all too easy to be sarcastic at this point but I refrained. "Nothing yet" came my reply, "in fact I'm trying to catch a pair of glasses." This he accepted as a legitimate reason for this madmans behaviour. "You can use my landing net if you like." He strolled off and returned with the net. It was better than mine. A longer handle and (thank goodness) a thin flexible frame which might not cause too much damage of the specs. Guess what, a couple of swoops in the mud and up they came! So pleased with the result, I put them on straight away disregarding the mud and weed which clung to them. Stepping onto the boat I confronted Sheri with the words "I give up - I'll never get them back now!" She didn't look up immediately but when she did turn her gaze from the magazine to me declared, "Well you'll just have to get some new ones now!" Er - hello ! Guess what I'm wearing. Maybe I look like that all the time! Then the penny dropped. So - it was to the holiday.

When you're moored on the river bank and taking long walks in the countryside it's great to bring a little nature back with you. Here's the vase full of wild flowers that are in bloom at the moment. Surprisingly - and you may have noticed this yourself - most of the flowers at present are a shade of purple. OK so yes there's some yellow and white too.
No, there aren't any endangered species in the vase but what did catch us by surprise was the behaviour of one wild bird that we'd never observed before. If you listened to Mondays Show early you'll have heard all about it. For those who missed it - this is what happened.
Whilst moored at Loddon we regularly saw a heron patrol up and down the river. We've seen it every time we've stayed at this spot and it's just a pity that Sheri didn't have her new camera handy on this ocassion.
The stillness was suddenly disturbed by a frantic squealing sound. It drew our attention to the heron now climbing away from the river up into the air. In its beak - a duckling! It's tiny legs were paddling wildly and its shrill quack sounding its' desperate attempt to escape the herons clutches. Moments later the heron came down on the other side of the reed bank and there was silence. We've never witnessed anything like this before but callers on Monday did confirm that heron do take wildlife other than just fish. We don't really want to witness anything like this again though.
On a lighter note, the flora is great this time of year and even these thistles bathed in the rays of the setting sun makes taking the evening walk along the riverbank a real treat.
We also met a remarkable guy who takes two weeks out every year to cruise the broads with half a dozen mentally handicapped people. Together with other volunteers, they moored up at Geldeston locks for a night and after they left the next morning we were assailed by a fleet of five large hire craft with fifty schoolboys and girls and ten teachers from Kent. Their behaviour was commendable and they were really lucky to be able to squeeze themselves in to the limited moorings. Although the weather turned cooler and cloudier towards the end of the week we still had a great break and if you've never yet tried this kind of getaway - try it. You may well be pleasantly surprised. The river will give you peace and quiet interspersed with interesting conversations, challenging cruising and the ocassional surprise. Never a dull moment.

1 comment:

Eddie 2-Sox said...

Nice pics Wally! Pop over to my place sometime, there's an award waiting for you....